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Students can get a jumpstart with Summer 2020 Courses. Offerings include design, architecture, photography, drawing, making, design thinking, historic preservation, real estate, and social innovation and social entrepreneurship. View the Tulane School of Architecture Summer 2020 Course Offerings.

Continue to check the TuSA COVID-19 FAQ page, and the Tulane Return to Campus website for updates.

 

Alumni (M.Arch '98) win international award for Confluence Park

Tulane School of Architecture alumni Tenna Florian (M.Arch ‘98) of Lake|Flato Architects in San Antonio, Texas, and Andrew Kudless (M.Arch ‘98) of Matsys Design in Oakland, California, were both on the design team for Confluence Park, which was recently awarded a 2019 Institute Honor Award for Architecture by AIA International. Additionally, Kudless who is an associate professor at California College of the Arts, was awarded the 2019 Faculty Design Award for Confluence Park by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture.

As described by the architects, “Along the bank of the San Antonio River, Confluence Park is a living laboratory designed to broaden its visitors’ understanding of south Texas ecotypes and the impact of urban development on local watersheds. A destination for learning and recreation, the park is a piece of the country’s largest environmental restoration project and an accessible gateway to outdoor activity.

"To better serve San Antonio’s most economically challenged communities, the San Antonio River Foundation tasked the design team with transforming a former construction storage yard into a unique outdoor education center. The design reflects the idea of confluence—the park is situated at the junction of the San Antonio River and San Pedro Creek—throughout. Grand gestures such as the park’s shaped lands represent the convergence of ecotypes, while the central pavilion’s concrete petal structures draw inspiration from plants that funnel rainwater to their roots. The petals, of which the pavilion boasts 22, stand 26 feet high and form a network of vaults that provide shade from the Texas sun and flow rainwater directly to an underground cistern.

"The park is located beside Mission Reach, an eight-mile stretch of the San Antonio River with a riparian woodland ecosystem that connects—via a network of pedestrian trails—the downtown San Antonio River Walk to several south side communities and five UNESCO World Heritage Spanish mission sites. Surrounding homeowners concerned about safety initially balked at the idea of the project and asked that adjacent dead-end streets remain fenced off. Throughout construction, foundation representatives canvased entire neighborhoods to provide updates on the park. These interpersonal connections created a groundswell of enthusiasm, and fences were eventually replaced with gates, providing easier access to a new neighborhood amenity.

"Early in the design process, the foundation realized it was creating a venue that could easily surpass its intended program. Evolving the design, the team and client trended toward the aspirational to maximize the efforts of local organizations striving to make a positive impact on San Antonio. Since the park opened, in March 2018, the collaborative ethos evident in the foundation’s directives has already made a positive impact on the community. In just a few short months, the park hosted nearly 140 educational events presented by 24 nonprofits which were attended by more than 9,000 registrants."

Read the official announcement from the AIA International here.

Read the ACSA Faculty Design Award announcement here.

Photo Credit: Casey Dunn

Professor Cordula Roser Gray publishes essay on social resilience

Architecture and Resilience. Essay by Cordular Roser Gray, Tulane School of Architecture

Professor of Practice Cordula Roser Gray’s new essay on social resilience, titled "Learning from New Orleans: Social Resilience for Urban Ecosystems" and coauthored with Marcella Del Signore, is featured in the new Routledge publication Architecture and Resilience - Interdisciplinary Dialogues

This volume takes resilience as a transformative concept to ask where and what architecture might contribute. Bringing together cross-disciplinary perspectives from architecture, urban design, art, geography, building science and psychoanalysis, it aims to open up multiple perspectives of research, spatial strategies and projects that are testing how we can build local resilience in preparation for major societal challenges, defining the position of architecture in urban resilience discourse.

To read more about the essay click here.

Tulane faculty prepare for ACSA Annual Meeting

The Tulane School of Architecture will be represented by a large delegation of professors at the 2019 Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture’s Annual Meeting. The conference, titled “BLACK BOX: Articulating Architecture's Core in the Post-Digital Era,” runs March 28-30 in Pittsburgh, PA. Read below for the list of Tulane Architecture faculty who will be in attendance, receiving awards and presenting their work.

  • Judith Kinnard is attending as part of the College of Distinguished Professors and participating in a workshop on accreditation.
  • Adam Modesitt will give a presentation titled "Unscripted: A Cenotaph for Richard Feynman."
  • Carrie Norman will present a paper to the "Draw(in)g to a (W)hole" panel, entitled "A Drawing Forged in Two and Three Dimensions."
  • Kenneth Schwartz will present a paper, co-written with Byron Mouton titled, "Agency and Immersion: Design Build & Social Entrepreneurship."
  • Ben Smith will present a paper titled “Looking Longer: The Thickening of Time Amidst Second-wave Digital Culture.”
  • Kentaro Tsubaki is attending on behalf of the ACSA Research and Scholarship committee. The committee will be running a Special Focus Session on Saturday for member feedback.
  • Ann Yoachim is attending to receive an ACSA Collaborative Practice Award, on behalf of the Tulane School of Architecture and the Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design.

For more information about the ACSA Annual Meeting, click here.

Small Center project named finalist for 2019 Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence

The Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence (RBA) selected Parasite Skatepark, a project of the Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design at the Tulane School of Architecture, as one of five finalists for its 2019 Gold and Silver medal prizes.

Parasite Skatepark is New Orleans' first official skatepark. Previously, the city had no official skateparks and few places for kids to exercise outside of team sports leagues. With that in mind, a group of skaters got together and started a Do-It-Yourself skatepark. Small Center faculty and architecture students provided technical assistance to the group, which ultimately evolved into into the nonprofit Transitional Spaces. Through time, strategic partnerships, and a series of state and local approvals, the grassroots public park officially opened in 2015.

“The range of issues addressed in this year’s submissions reflect the evolution of our understanding of placemaking in cities,” said RBA founder Simeon Bruner in a press release. “The five finalists illustrate the shifting role of design in response to the imperatives of social inclusivity and environmental resilience.”

Celebrating its 30th anniversary this year, RBA is a biennial design award recognizing transformative places that contribute to the economic, environmental, and social vitality of American cities. Seventy-eight projects in 27 states have been honored since its founding. The Gold Medalist will receive $50,000 and four Silver Medalists will each receive $10,000 to enhance their projects.

RBA entries comprise completed projects across the contiguous United States. Finalists and medalists are chosen by a nationwide committee of urban experts through an in-depth evaluation process involving input from the award application, site visits, interviews with project participants and community members, and committee discussions.

For more information, read the RBA blog post.

Tulane School of Architecture's community design center nationally recognized for collaborative approach

Thirteen years of working hand-in-hand with partners, students, and faculty has led the Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design at the Tulane School of Architecture to be recognized with a national architecture award this week.

The Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture named the Small Center, which is housed within the Tulane School of Architecture, as one of only four Collaborative Practice Award recipients for the 2018-2019 academic year.

In particular, the award highlights the Parasite Skatepark project, a New Orleans park that officially opened in 2015 following years of efforts by local skaters to establish a recreation space. The Small Center provided various types of technical assistance, such as convening stakeholders and designing the park’s masterplan. Ultimately, collaboration between a nonprofit of local skaters, city and state agencies, professional architects, and Tulane students led to the designation of the city’s first official skatepark.

The project shows that the design process can serve as a capacity and coalition builder, said Ann Yoachim, Small Center director and professor of practice at the Tulane School of Architecture. And the award is a reflection of the center’s belief that engagement is a core part of any successful design effort, she said.

“Teaching students to recognize the value of partner expertise, the necessity of a multitude of voices to produce high-quality responsive design projects, and the power of design to address larger societal issues is at a core of the Center’s mandate. We are honored to be recognized by our peers for this commitment,” Yoachim said. “Together, we will continue to work to create a city that is shaped by all.”

“This award is a recognition of the Tulane School of Architecture’s leadership, through the Small Center, in architecture and social engagement. We are committed to supporting our community through high quality design and beauty, which are essential to develop pride and care for neighborhoods,” said Iñaki Alday, dean of the Tulane School of Architecture and Koch Chair in Architecture. “Each project is also an innovative exploration, advancing the field of design and of community engagement processes through multidisciplinary modes, all in the real life.”

Since 1997, the ACSA’s Collaborative Practice Award honors best practices in university-based and community-engaged programs. This award was proposed by Thomas Dutton and Anthony Schuman as a means to recognize ACSA’s commitment to community partnerships in which faculty, students and neighborhood citizens are valued equally and that aim to address issues of social injustice through design.

Tulane University Launches the Country’s Only MBA/Sustainable Real Estate Development Degree Program

The A. B. Freeman School of Business at Tulane University has announced a partnership with the Tulane University School of Architecture to meet the increasing demand for business professionals equipped with the tools for a career in real estate development. The MBA/MSRED will offer students an unrivaled preparation with a broad foundation in business disciplines as well as specialized knowledge from the country’s only master’s degree program in Sustainable Real Estate Development.

“With the exponential growth of the real estate market, prospective real estate professionals must combine business expertise with an understanding of the social and environmental costs of development,” says Ira Solomon, dean of the Freeman School. “The MBA/MSRED program builds upon the rigorous core of the Freeman School’s nationally ranked MBA program to create a comprehensive and holistic approach to sustainable development.”

In conjunction with Tulane’s School of Architecture, the program awards students an MBA and a master’s degree in Sustainable Real Estate Development. Through the real-world application of theory to current real estate development projects, graduates will be prepared for the rapidly evolving challenges facing the industry. Students will be equipped to successfully manage in all areas of real estate development – finance, analytics, design, management and consulting – with both the qualitative and quantitative skills needed to make informed business decisions.

“We are disrupting how real estate has been taught to drive change in the educational landscape of this field,” says Casius Pealer, director of Sustainable Real Estate Development and Shane Professor of Practice at the Tulane School of Architecture. “We want students to analyze the implications of technology, environmental changes and urbanization to better understand how political, ecological and cultural forces impact real estate development. By creating an interdisciplinary program, our alumni can anticipate the long term social and financial effects of development.”

The MBA/MSRED is an accelerated two-year, full-time program delivered during the weekday from the historic Tulane University campus in Uptown New Orleans as well as the Freeman School’s new facility in vibrant downtown. Students will benefit from Freeman’s small cohorts, active learning environment, and direct engagement with industry leaders. Freeman is also offering new real estate specializations in its full time and Professional MBA programs, as well as in its 10 month Master of Management program.

For more about the program and to apply, click here.

Tulane launches nation’s first MBA/Sustainable Real Estate Development degree program

The A. B. Freeman School of Business at Tulane University has announced a partnership with the Tulane University School of Architecture to meet the increasing demand for business professionals equipped with the tools for a career in real estate development. The MBA/MSRED will offer students an unrivaled preparation with a broad foundation in business disciplines as well as specialized knowledge from the country’s only master’s degree program in Sustainable Real Estate Development.

“With the exponential growth of the real estate market, prospective real estate professionals must combine business expertise with an understanding of the social and environmental costs of development,” says Ira Solomon, dean of the Freeman School. “The MBA/MSRED program builds upon the rigorous core of the Freeman School’s nationally ranked MBA program to create a comprehensive and holistic approach to sustainable development.”

In conjunction with Tulane’s School of Architecture, the program awards students an MBA and a master’s degree in Sustainable Real Estate Development.  Through the real-world application of theory to current real estate development projects, graduates will be prepared for the rapidly evolving challenges facing the industry. Students will be equipped to successfully manage in all areas of real estate development – finance, analytics, design, management and consulting – with both the qualitative and quantitative skills needed to make informed business decisions.

“We are disrupting how real estate has been taught to drive change in the educational landscape of this field,” says Casius Pealer, director of Sustainable Real Estate Development and Shane Professor of Practice at the Tulane School of Architecture. “We want students to analyze the implications of technology, environmental changes and urbanization to better understand how political, ecological and cultural forces impact real estate development. By creating an interdisciplinary program, our alumni can anticipate the long term social and financial effects of development.”

The MBA/MSRED is an accelerated two-year, full-time program delivered during the weekday from the historic Tulane University campus in Uptown New Orleans as well as the Freeman School’s new facility in vibrant downtown. Students will benefit from Freeman’s small cohorts, active learning environment and direct engagement with industry leaders. Freeman is also offering new real estate specializations in its full-time and Professional MBA programs, as well as in its 10-month Master of Management program.

“New Orleans is an exceptional place to study real estate development because of its storied history, ongoing redevelopment and rapid growth,” says Matt Schwartz, co-chief executive officer of The Domain Companies.  “Our rich architectural history and dedication to preservation blends with the innovative development strategies currently driving the reinvestment in and revitalization of the city, making New Orleans an exceptional incubator for learning.”

Professor wins international design competition

Associate Professor Margarita Jover, with aldayjover architecture and landscape, has won the International Design Competition for 'High Park' in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The one and a half miles of repurposed highway will connect the city’s most populated informal settlement with its historic downtown. Read more.

Tulane School of Architecture programs rank among nation’s best

The Tulane School of Architecture is named a top institution in a recent prominent national ranking of architecture and design schools.

Tulane’s undergraduate architecture program placed at No. 16 and the graduate program at No. 31 in the “Most Admired Architecture Schools” category of DesignIntelligence Quarterly’s 2018-2019 America's Top Ranked Architecture & Design Schools survey. This is the undergraduate program’s third consecutive appearance in the top 20.

The annual survey polled more than 6,000 industry hiring professionals on which accredited schools they most admire and hire from, and how recent graduates are performing in key focus areas.

“As a small school with young programs, this solid ranking is impressive,” said Iñaki Alday, School of Architecture dean. “Most importantly, we are on a positive track, building our reputation among our peers and professional firms.”

The DesignIntelligence rankings are the most widely recognized among architecture and design schools and are referenced by many prospective students.

“Recognition in the rankings is great for our visibility, but our focus is the strength and innovative character of our mission,” said Alday. “Tulane has always been an intellectually independent and forward-looking school, committed to positively impacting and transforming the world and our community. The challenges that we are facing in both are urgent and require our full attention.”

Fall 2018 News

Fall 2018 News Cover

Fall 2018 News from the Tulane School of Architecture is now available online. Meet our new dean, get to know four impressive new faculty members, see what students, faculty and alumni are up to, and more in the pages of the annual publication.

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