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Dozens of Tulane alumni, faculty, students honored at AIA New Orleans Design Awards

Dozens of alumni, faculty, and students were honored at the New Orleans chapter of the American Institute of Architects 2020 Design Awards Program. 

More than 20 different awards had Tulane School of Architecture affiliations. Two projects, which each won two awards, were created and directed through the school’s design-build programs URBANbuild and the Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design. The virtual awards program, hosted by local celebrity Bryan Batt, was organized by a team of AIA members, including Andrew Liles, Adjunct Assistant Lecturer at Tulane School of Architecture.

Each year, the AIA New Orleans chapter celebrates the best of this region’s architecture, recognize achievement in a broad range of architectural work, and inform the public of the breadth and value of architectural practice. 

Below is a listing of the awarded buildings, homes, and projects, including Tulane alumni, faculty and students named in order with which they were announced in the AIA New Orleans awards program. To view the full program recording, click here.


Unbuilt Architecture 
•    Honorable Mention in Unbuilt Architecture: Bayou Community Academy – Gould Evans and Duplantis Design Group, Adjunct Lecturer Jason Butz.  

Divine Detail
•    Honor Award in Divine Detail: Open House – Team A/C, Assistant Professors Carrie Norman and Adam Modesitt, as well as Tulane School of Architecture students and graduates and non-Tulane students Leah Bohatch (A ’23), Rachel Bennett (A ’23), Sara Bhatia (A ’21), Adrian Evans (A *20), Riley Lacalli (A *19), Seth Laskin (A ’23), Willa Richards (daughter of Sam Richards), Seneca Gray (A *20), and Ryan Shabaan (A ’20). 

Interior Architecture
•    Award of Merit in Interior Architecture: Keesler Federal Credit Union – Colectivo, Professor of Practice Emilie Taylor Welty (A *06), Seth Welty (A ’08), Matthew Raybon (A ’17).
•    Honor Award for Interior Architecture: Maison de la Luz – EskewDumezRipple, Max Katz (A ’16). 

Residential Design
•    Honorable Mention in Residential Design: URBANbuild 14 – BILD design LLC, Professor of Practice Byron Mouton and Tulane School of Architecture students and graduates Rene Duplantier (A *19), Keristen Edwards (A ’20, MSRED *20), Kalyn Faller (A *20), Gian-Carol Hernandez-San Martin (A ’20), Nicholas Kallman (A ’19, A ’21), Mateus Klabin (A ’20), Ashley Libys (A *19), William McCollum (A *19, MSRED *19), Katelin Morgan (A *19, MSRED *19), Emmanuel Rotich (A ’19, MSRED *20), Ana Sandoval Aguilar (A ’19), Julia Scholl (A ’20), Wei Xiao (A *19), Yuang Zhao (A *19), Bruna Aoki (A *18), Michelle Barrett (A *19).

Historic Preservation 
•    Award of Merit in Historic Preservation, Restoration, and Adaptive Reuse: Hotel Peter + Paul – studioWTA, Wayne Troyer (A ’83), Tracie Ashe (A ’02), Natan Diacon-Furtado (A *14), Sergio Padilla (A ’03, A *04), Adjunct Lecturer Toni DiMaggio (A ’03), Alyce Deshotels (A *14), Ray Croft (A *14), Elizabeth Simpson (A *12).
•    Honor Award for Historic Preservation, Restoration and Adaptive Reuse: The Schoolhouse – Rome Office, Mollie Burke (A ’11) and Gustavo Rodas (A ’16).

Architecture 
•    Honorable Mention in Architecture – Nora Navra Library – Manning Architects, Dominic Willard (A ’03) and Michelle Carroll-Barr (A *14). 
•    Honorable Mention in Architecture: Groundwork Earth Lab – Tulane's Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design, Assistant Professor Adam Modesitt, Professor of Practice Emilie Taylor Welty (A *06), Adjunct Lecturer Nick Jenisch (A ’03), and Tulane School of Architecture then-students Michelle Barrett (A *19), Kay Curtis (A ’19), Dana Elliot (A *19), Clayton Hakes (A ’19), Jacqueline Esmay (A ’19), Jared Faske (A ’19), Dylan Goldweit-Denton (A ’19), Emily Kanner (A ’19), Bryn E. Koeppel (A ’19), Riley Lacalli (A *19), Caroline LaFleche (A ’19), Collin Moosbrugger (A ’19), Margaret Swinford (A ’19), Max Warshaw (A *19, MSRED *19).
•    Award of Merit for Architecture: Warehouse District Offices – Trapolin-Peer Architects, Peter Trapolin (A ’77).
•    Award of Merit for Architecture: Talise Rainwater Catchment and Filtration System – Elizabeth Chen, Elizabeth Chen (A ’06).
•    Honor Award in Architecture: Sculpture Pavilion – Lee Ledbetter & Associates, Sara Harper (A *17).
•    Honor Award in Architecture: Rouquette Library – VergesRome Architects, APAC, Steven H. Rome (B *17) and Scott Andrews (B ’85). 

People’s Choice
•    People’s Choice Award: URBANbuild 14 – BILD design LLC, Professor of Practice Byron Mouton and Tulane School of Architecture students and graduates (listed in previous award entry).


Excellence in Sustainability
•    USGBC Award for Excellence in Sustainability: Groundwork Earth Lab – Tulane's Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design, Assistant Professor Adam Modesitt, Professor of Practice Emilie Taylor Welty, Adjunct Lecturer Nick Jenisch, and Tulane School of Architecture students and graduates (listed in previous award entry). 
•    USGBC Award for Excellence in Sustainability: Talise Rainwater Catchment and Filtration System – Elizabeth Chen, Elizabeth Chen (A ’06).

Industry
•    Industry Award for Construction: Avenue Family Dentistry – Perrier Esquerre Contractors and Scairono Martinez Architects, Barry Scairono (A ’81)
•    Industry Award for Construction: Higgins Hotel and Conference Center – Palmisano and Nichols Brosch Wurst Wolfe & Associates, Scott Evans (A *98)
•    Industry Award for Landscape: The Standard – Spackman Mossop Michaels and Morris Adjmi Architects, Morris Adjmi (A ’83).

Emerging Professionals
•    EP Associate Award: Bryan Bradshaw (A *17)
•    Young Architect Award: Julie Babin (A ’06)
 
 

Sukkah in the age of coronavirus

Every year, for the past 11 years, students in the Tulane School of Architecture have built a sukkah, an open-air hut-like structure under which Jews celebrate Sukkot, a week-long fall harvest festival.

In partnership with Tulane Hillel, students typically build the sukkah in Pocket Park, making it a convenient dining venue for those grabbing lunch from the LBC, the Commons or a nearby food truck.

This year, however, the Sukkah Build Project, dubbed Sukkah 12, presented new challenges, thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Our goals were very specific this year,” said Lizzie Bateman, a fifth-year architecture student. “We aimed to create a Sukkah which is COVID-19-conscious and allows for social distancing. This has called for a reimagining of the typical Sukkah typology. Because this was also a design build during COVID-19, our design had to go up quickly, and the students constructing it couldn’t be exposed to one another.”

The team of seven achieved its goal on Oct. 1. They did it quickly and masterfully, in part, because they did much of the work ahead of time, including designing and building pre-fabricated walls in the School of Architecture’s Millhaus, one of the school's Fabrication Labs. The finished product is made of pine and measures 10.5 feet by 12 feet. It has built-in seats that allow four people to sit socially distanced, and it has two walls instead of the traditional three to facilitate safe passage.

Seth Laskin, a junior who has been participating in the project since he was a freshman and served as its leader this year, said the design build was especially gratifying, given the added the challenges surrounding it.

“So much goes into planning beyond what is seen in the final product, from design meetings, to material collection, budget planning, and coordination with the TU Hillel,” Laskin said.  

The team’s goal, he said, was to produce something that reflects the brilliance of Tulane’s architecture students. “The team as a whole is truly so talented, and this project was an amazing opportunity for our collective opinions and skills to be demonstrated.”

Bateman agreed. "Our hope was for people to enjoy the space and feel safe while doing so," she said. "We think it works really well in capturing people's attention and making the interior space exciting and inviting."

View the Sukkah 12 photo gallery here.

Story by Barri Bronston / Tulane University

Tulane becomes first U.S. institution to sign pledge for climate action

In September 2020, Tulane School of Architecture became the first U.S. institution to sign on to an international pledge for climate action, followed by two other institutions shortly thereafter.

In the summer of 2020, U.S.-based practices took action and signed on to join the international pledge. With the U.S. Architects Declare movement growing since May and over 284 signatures added to the list, three architecture institutions have signed on to the movement so far, according to an Oct. 7 story in Archinect.

Tulane School of Architecture, Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design, and Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture are the first architecture programs to sign on. A movement initially starting in May 2019 in the U.K., firms and studios worldwide have pledged their efforts to fight climate change and biodiversity issues. 

U.S. Architects Declare is led by a group of volunteer architects and designers throughout the country. Their site states, "All built-environment/construction-industry professionals are welcome to join us whether you've signed the declaration or not (including grads, interior designers, students, engineers, building-designers, builders, engineers, etc.)"

Despite 2020 being an extremely challenging year due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the social and political unrest happening across the country, architecture institutions have branched out to propel their efforts towards fighting climate change.

Learn more at us.architectsdeclare.com.

Historic preservation alumnus awarded National Park Service fellowship

Tulane School of Architecture alumnus Christopher Cody (MPS '14) was recently awarded an inaugural fellowship from the National Park Service, in partnership with Preservation Maryland. The Harrison Goodall Preservation Fellowship will support Cody’s work to reform demolition-by-neglect practices across Arizona. Cody is one of three fellows to receive the new award, which aims to promote innovation and professional growth in the field of historic preservation.

Cody graduated with a Master’s of Preservation Studies in 2014 from Tulane School of Architecture and is now Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer in Phoenix, AZ. When he began his job in Arizona, Cody traveled the state extensively and heard from preservationists and community leaders nearly everywhere that demolition of historic structures due to neglect was their biggest challenge. 

“Having studied preservation in New Orleans and worked in Charleston, SC, both communities with very strong preservation ethics, I know how important saving historic buildings is to a community's sense of place and identity,” Cody said. “And I know that my project has the potential to help Arizona's cities and towns on many levels.”

Demolition by neglect occurs when historic structures are threatened by absent owners who do not provide necessary maintenance to keep the property stable, thus requiring demolition. Many of these structures are within historic downtown areas, and Cody plans to research legal barriers and develop model ordinances for use across the state of Arizona, as well as create a legislative advocacy plan if state laws require modification. Through his fellowship, Cody will also receive expert guidance from a mentor – Will Cook, an attorney with Cultural Heritage Partners LLP and a nationally recognized expert in historic preservation law concerning demolition-by-neglect ordinances.

Read more about the inaugural Harrison Goodall Preservation Fellowship by the National Park Service, in partnership with Preservation Maryland.
 

Faculty, alumni win several AIA Louisiana Honor Awards

Several faculty, alumni and friends of Tulane School of Architecture are among the recipients for the newly announced AIA Louisiana Honor Awards 2020. Of the 10 awarded projects, 7 projects name individuals with ties to Tulane School of Architecture, including 2 awards for Emilie Taylor Welty, Favrot II Professor of Practice and Design/Build Manager at the Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design. 

The Architecture Honor Awards program recognizes achievements for a broad range of architectural activity in order to elevate the general quality of architectural practice, to establish a standard of excellence against which all architects can measure performance, and to inform the public expectations for architectural practice, its breadth, and its value.

Below are the Tulane-affiliated projects, according to the AIA Louisiana Honor Awards list and Tulane alumni relations office records.

Sculpture Garden Pavilion        
Sara Harper, A *17    
        
Royal Street Residence        
Alexander Adamick, TC '05    
Alex Barthel, A *17    
        
Arthur Ashe Oak Park Edible Schoolyard        
Seth Welty, A '08    
Emilie Taylor Welty, A *06, Favrot II Professor of Practice    
Sarah Satterlee, A *14    
        
Dorgenois Residence        
Seth Welty, A '08    
Emilie Taylor Welty, A *06, Favrot II Professor of Practice
Andy O'Brien, A '21  
        
Thaden School Master Plan        
Christian Rodriguez, AIA, A '10    
        
The Historic New Orleans Collection Seignouret-Brulatour House and Tricentennial Wing
F. Macnaughton Ball, Jr., Former Advisory Board Member    
Dennis Horchoff, E '75    
Brian Swanner, A '92    
Charles Sterkx, A '88    
Steve Scollo, A '97    
Emily Hayden Palumbo, A '05    
Kate Peaden, A '11    
Jerry Blanchard, A *06    
        
The Garage (pictured above)        
Marcel Wisznia, AIA, A '73, Advisory Board Member
Daniel Weiner, AIA, A '90    
Michael Whitehead, TC '06, A *09    
Ralph Bradshaw, AIA, A '67    
Simcha Ward, AIA, A '11, Alumni Council Member/Chair, Advisory Board Member
M. Haynes Johnston, A *19    
Randy Hutchison, A '97    
Cameron Richard, AIA, A *03, Former Advisory Board Member
William Tyler Sandlass, AIA, A *09    
Sam Levin, A '12    
Chris Daemmrich, A '17, Alumni Council Member
Keely Williams, A '08, A *09    
Kelly Calhoun, A *17, Alumni Council Member
Bonnie Mitchell, A '99    
Staci Rosenberg, NC '80, L *83, B *84    
Allison Schiller, A *12    

For the full awards program, click here.

Architecture graduate student pens Places Journal essay on historic Murs à Pêches orchards

Tulane architecture graduate student Théa Spring recently completed the inaugural Places Journal Summer Writing + Editing Workshop. Spring was one of 26 students to participate in an immersive Zoom-based course taught by Places editors this summer and included lectures, group discussions, one-on-one coaching and peer-to-peer exchange. During the session and afterwards, students worked closely with the editors to hone their writing skills in the realm of rigorous and accessible public scholarship, and each produced a brief essay on the theme of “Architecture, Urbanism, Pandemics.”

Spring's essay, titled "Coloring the Murs á Pêches," explores the history of the Murs à Pêches, a once vast peach orchard in Montreuil, Paris, France. Beginning with its origins in 1916 to present day August 2020, the orchard has had significant cultural, economic, and spatial influences on the neighborhood and city, as well as efforts to restore the area. Spring also researched the history of Fruits Défendus Association, part of the Fédération MAP, a group of organizations that joined forces in 1994 to defend the Murs à Pêches from the encroachment of concrete. Today, 30 of the orchard's 300 hectares remain, with only eight-and-a-half hectares protected as horticultural landscape heritage.

"Some of the most fascinating parts of the workshop took place during discussions on the importance of public scholarship, particularly in the realm of architecture, landscape, and urbanism," Spring said. "In contrast and complement to academic writing, public scholarship such as the works published by Places Journal are always accessible to be read by anyone, regardless of their field and budget (its entire archive is free to explore). I find this to be a very important and pertinent standard in a discipline flooded with a rather limited vocabulary that is often disconnected to human experience. The quote in my article by the French writer Georges Perec is perhaps a wink to that: he has described spaces with few words in a way most graphics never could."

Spring said two elements drove her to write this piece: the reader could be anyone and there will only be a reader, or another potential individual to discuss with if the writing inspires it.

"I hope to continue clarifying my position through writing... at least until the day I manage to build something that speaks for itself (though realistically, such an event would probably require... more writing)," Spring said. 

Below is an excerpt from "Coloring the Murs á Pêches" by Théa Spring in Places Journal.

...

From above, long rectangular lots striate the landscape. Their origins date to the mid 17th century, when the use of walls as an agricultural tool was first developed.1 Their materials were available on site: rock, clay, and gypsum, more commonly known as plaster of Paris. Built up to an elevation of three meters, the longer edges of the lot were positioned north to south and spaced about twelve meters apart to receive maximum sun exposure. By shielding winds and stocking heat, the plots between these walls enjoyed a microclimate eight to ten degrees Celsius warmer than the surrounding area. First used to grow grapes, they soon welcomed an exotic fruit adored in royal courts and until then only cultivated in the south of France: "la pêche," the peach.

The land was productive, but also experimental. As Parisian demand for fruits and vegetables increased, a complex system was developed by the Montreuillois combining horticulture, viticulture, and arboriculture. By selling their goods directly in central markets, producers were able to use buying trends to inform the development of new methods and varieties. Peaches, sold profitably to the bourgeoisie, often became the subject of and fuel for such inventions. Their high maintenance was anthropomorphized; trees were “dressed” and “refreshed,” fruits were “cleaned” of their fuzz with a novel rotating brush, and even protected with revolvers set to detonate against garden intruders through a system of strings. Like secret lovers, new varieties were given erotic names such as "Le Téton de Vénus," the Nipple of Venus, or "La Grosse Mignonne," the Fat Cutie. By the end of the 18th century, the area of the Murs à Pêches reached its apogee with over 300 hectares of walled lots — one-third of Montreuil.

...

Read more about the inaugural Places Journal Summer Writing + Editing Workshop.

The Charrette student publication receives Haskell Award

Tulane School of Architecture's student-run publication The Charrette recently won the prestigious 2020 Douglas Haskell Award for Student Journals, given by the Center for Architecture in New York City. Only four student publications from across the country were awarded the honor.

The 2020 Charrette publication - which celebrates its 10th anniversary this year - used the theme "In Flux" to capture explorations into that which is changing, impermanent, and up-in-the-air, said Caroline Garfield (M.Arch '20), who is co-editor with third year M.Arch student Seth Laskin. The publication's faculty advisor is Associate Professor of Architecture Wendy Redfield

“For me, the title ‘In Flux’ is a reminder of the ever-changing state of life that we live in," Laskin said. "Especially in such an unpredictable period of time, working on the ‘In Flux’ issue with The Charrette through quarantine was both ironic and symbolic of how relevant our topic was.”  

Every year The Charrette seeks to explore representation, interactive installations, film, and other aspects of design through architecture, art, and writing. The editorial staff is comprised of students from all years who foster a collaborative studio culture and a supportive artistic environment. The Charrette encourages students to step back from their desks and consider the ways in which an architectural education influences their perception of the world beyond architecture school. Work featured in The Charrette is by undergraduate and graduate students, along with some faculty, highlighting a variety of skills and interests. 

The annual Haskell Award was founded to encourage student journalism on architecture, planning, and related subjects, and to foster regard for intelligent criticism among future professionals. The award is named for architectural journalist and editor Douglas Haskell, an editor of Architectural Forum  from 1949 to 1964, where he was very influential in stopping the demolition of Grand Central Station. 

Coordinating production of The Charrette during the COVID-19 pandemic in the spring and summer of 2020 brought several challenges for the student-based team, said Garfield and Laskin. The editors had to work remotely across different states and couldn't sit side-by-side to tweak the graphics and layout to ensure clarity, as they normally would. The timeline needed to be adjusted, while stilling meeting the print deadline to submit their publication for the Haskell Award. Luckily, local print shop Constance, which The Charrette has worked with for its specialized risograph printed issues, was open during this time to complete the final step of the process, Laskin said. A unique characteristic of The Charrette is the exclusive use of a risograph printer as an environmentally sustainable print publication.

"One advantage of working from our quarantine spaces is that there weren’t many distractions!” Garfield said.

The Haskell Award is a huge honor, one the students said they hope to continue with future issues.

“I am ecstatic. This has been my dream ever since I heard about the Haskell Award a few years ago," Garfield said. "I became a member of The Charrette team early in my school experience and enjoyed being a part of it year after year. By fifth year, I felt that I could contribute a lot as the lead editor and enhance the legacy of student journalism at Tulane Architecture. It is amazing to see how The Charrette has grown over the years, continuously perpetuating student discourse in design. I am so proud of my team, who persisted despite having to adapt to Zoom studio and circumstances of quarantine.”  

"I plan to focus our energy on this publication in the coming years and hopefully win it again!" said Laskin, who will continue as an editor. "Thank you to everyone involved including students who submitted their work, our faculty advisor, design team members, those who supported our exhibitions, and of course to the jurors of the Haskell Award for considering us for the prize.” 

For the full announcement by the Center for Architecture, click here

Colorado magazine features Kaci Taylor (A '13)

Kaci Taylor (M.Arch '13) was recently featured in a profile in 5280 Magazine and a related piece in Colorado's News 9 station. Below is an excerpt from the piece, titled "Colorado’s Only Black, Female Architect on Designing an Inclusive World," published July 30, 2020. Taylor believes in the power of asking questions and listening closely. She's made it the foundation of her Denver architectural firm, THE5WH.

Kaci Taylor was always attuned to space, even as a child growing up in Los Angeles. She noticed when a room soothed her, for example, or when an entrance seemed to welcome her. “I was a very shy kid,” she says, “so finding spaces that felt supportive was really important in helping me feel comfortable engaging with people and getting out of my shell.”

But at times, finding such environments proved difficult. Taylor, like many Black Americans, often encountered disquieting reminders of her country’s racist history. Such signposts seemed to be entangled in the nation’s very infrastructure: Some were overt, like statues honoring enslavers or buildings, roads, and towns named for openly racist politicians. Others were more subtle, like the looming columns endemic to antebellum-style architecture. “A lot of spaces have elements that allude to the past, that remind people of color that they were once the property of someone else,” Taylor says.

For Taylor, a career in architecture was a way to address the gulf between some of the thoughtless design she saw in the United States, and the comforting spaces she knew people craved. Prioritizing humans, not history or profit, is the keystone of the two-year-old architecture and consulting firm she founded and runs by herself in Denver, called THE5WH. Through her work on single and multifamily residences, along with mid-sized commercial and mixed-use projects, she hopes to build a more inclusive city.

Of course, even getting to this point was a challenge. Taylor is one of just 18 Black architects currently working in Colorado, and the only woman of that bunch, according to the Directory of African American Architects.  According to the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), 7,804 architects registered for licenses allowing them to practice in Colorado in 2018, and in 2019, fewer than one in five new architects identified as a racial minority. “It has everything to do with systematic racism,” Taylor says. “Those who can afford to get an architecture degree in the first place often face a very discouraging, microaggression-filled environment. It can be mentally draining.”

Taylor recalls often being the only Black, female architect in the room, and says she often experienced gaslighting while working in the industry: She would point out a problem early in the design process and be ignored, only to have construction go wrong and be reprimanded for the mistake. When she stood up for her ideas, she was accused of being combative and confrontational. She did receive praise for her work, but promotions rarely accompanied the plaudits.

Such barriers and frustrations often push people of color out of the industry, Taylor says. African American architects are 14 percent more likely than their white peers to say they’ve faced discrimination at work, and two thirds of African Americans said they can’t identify people in leadership roles that look like them, according to a joint survey conducted this year by NCARB and National Organization of Minority Architects. These problems contribute to a lack of diversity that hinders good design. “I think we can all get stuck in our own little bubble,” Taylor says. “In an inclusive atmosphere, ideas are generated that can then spark other, amazing innovations.”

She experienced that inventive energy while getting her masters degree at Tulane University in New Orleans (while there, she worked on homes for folks displaced by Hurricane Katrina) and during her time in San Francisco, where she designed affordable housing. Taylor is especially proud of her work on the Mercantile Hotel in Missoula, Montana, helping revamp a historic building into a full-service hotel. Mentors helped her along the way. “I’ve met some great co-workers and great bosses,” Taylor says. “But people need to learn and address their internal biases and become educated on how other people experience things.”

To read the full story, click here.

Tulane awarded funding to bring patient perspective to COVID-19 research

Tulane University has been awarded $150,000 from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to use equity-focused design to improve community participation in public health research against COVID-19.

The Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Award will fund an equity focused, human centered design process to understand the needs and values of underrepresented stakeholders around patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) and produce an equity-centered design thinking toolkit for communities to improve engagement in research. 

“It’s critically important that we hear from people experiencing the impacts of COVID19 in the community setting, and that we use those voices to inform our research priorities going forward,” said award recipient Alessandra Bazzano, PhD, associate professor at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and Carnegie Corporation of New York professor of social entrepreneurship at Tulane’s Phyllis M. Taylor Center for Social Innovation and Design Thinking.

Bazzano will lead the project with Lesley-Ann Noel, PhD, professor of practice at Tulane University School of Architecture and associate director for design thinking for social impact at the Taylor Center. 

Racial disparities and social determinants shape health inequality in the United States. The COVID19 pandemic disproportionately impacts vulnerable groups, particularly minority populations, incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people, and those unable to practice physical distancing. People most likely to be impacted by the pandemic are excluded or underrepresented in much research, both as participants and researchers, Bazzano said.

“Input from community members has too often been left out of research in the past and is at risk of being sidelined in health emergencies like this, but this input is crucial to making research beneficial for our hardest hit populations and improving responsiveness to day-to-day needs,” Bazzano said. “Health research in this pandemic isn’t just for scientific journals and academics. It is for everyone, and likewise should include all voices for improving health equity.”

Design thinking is a human-centered approach that draws from the designer's toolkit to put people at the heart of understanding, experimenting and acting when addressing challenges.

 “I’m really excited to see how we can leverage the best elements of the way we think, work and do research as designers to support people in medicine and public health to create research agendas around COVID-19,” Noel said. “I’m certain that the human-centeredness and participatory nature of our approaches can contribute to adding the patient voice to medical research agendas.”

The project will build an advisory core of patient community members, drawn from groups underrepresented in research, who will engage in equity-centered design thinking activities and a research prioritization process. 

Partners include the Taylor Center for Social Innovation and Design Thinking and the Louisiana Public Health Institute as well as patient partners committed to the project.

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute is an independent, nonprofit organization authorized by Congress in 2010 to fund comparative effectiveness research that will provide patients, their caregivers, and clinicians with the evidence needed to make better-informed health and healthcare decisions. PCORI is committed to seeking input from a broad range of stakeholders to guide its work.

Original story by Keith Brannon, Tulane Public Relations.

Designer, historian, and architect Dr. Edson Cabalfin joins Tulane School of Architecture

Designer, historian, and architect Dr. Edson Cabalfin joins Tulane School of Architecture

 

Internationally recognized designer, historian, architect, researcher and author Edson Cabalfin, PhD, has been appointed to the Tulane School of Architecture as Director of the Social Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship (SISE) program and Professor of Practice in Design Thinking. He will start on Aug. 15, 2020.

 

“The position is a great opportunity to be able to create and shape the program to have a bigger impact,” said Cabalfin, whose work, research and teaching interests focus on the power of design in contributing to social change.

 

A licensed and registered architect in the Philippines, Cabalfin also runs his design consultancy Talyer Kayumanggi/Brown Workshop, based in Cincinnati and Manila, with projects in architecture, interior design, set design, costume design, fashion design, exhibition design, graphic design, and design strategy in North America, Southeast Asia, Europe, and the Middle East in the last 25 years.  Cabalfin said his design studio, which in Filipino means “Brown Workshop,” celebrates his brown-ness and says “Here I am. I’m Filipino and I have a voice.” Filipino history, he said, is connected to what is being expressed in the world now. The Philippines was colonized by Spain from the 17thto 19thcenturies and then by the United States from 1898 to 1946.

 

Among his accomplishments, Cabalfin was the Curator of the Philippine Pavilion at the 16th Venice Architecture Biennale in 2018. The exhibition “The City Who Had Two Navels” shines light on the history and trauma of colonialism and neoliberalism in the country and the impacts it has had on the urban landscape and the persistence of economic and social disparities. Cabalfin also wrote the book “What Kids Should Know About Filipino Architecture” (Adarna Books, 2015).

 

Before coming to Tulane, Cabalfin was Associate Professor and Coordinator of the Interior Design Program in the School of Architecture and Interior Design in the College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning at the University of Cincinnati. He has also previously taught in various capacities at Cornell University, University of the Philippines, Far Eastern University, University of Santo Tomas, and De la Salle – College of Saint Benilde.

 

As the head of the Tulane School of Architecture’s SISE program, Cabalfin said his role is being both a visionary and a facilitator. He said he hopes to provide a clear vision and direction for the program, helping leverage the research agenda of the program and bring it to an international level. As a facilitator for the program, he said he will employ a participatory and democratic process in bringing this vision to reality. 

 

“It needs to be a shared vision. It cannot be only my vision,” Cabalfin said.

 

Tulane’s commitment and ethos towards civic engagement and social responsibility attracted Cabalfin to the university.

 

“Looking at the different programs around the country, Tulane and Tulane School of Architecture impressed me with its commitment in creating and contributing to social impact,” he said.

 

Cabalfin’s research in the last two decades has focused on the interdisciplinary and transnational intersections of architecture history and theory, cultural studies, gender and sexuality studies, postcolonial theory, Southeast Asian studies, spatial justice, public interest design, and heritage conservation. One of his accomplishments while at the University of Cincinnati, he organized an international-study program in Southeast Asia with a design studio focusing on the 2013 typhoon Haiyan disaster recovery in Leyte, Philippines. The project connected design to issues of power structures, community engagement, and participatory research in addressing problems facing a resettlement site that lacked support systems to provide people with livelihood, water, education, and sense of community. The studio produced a book, recommendations for government officials and stakeholders, and held an exhibition in Cincinnati to share the project.

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