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Sri Lanka and World Bank visit Tulane for water expertise

Tulane School of Architecture recently hosted a dozen officials from the Sri Lankan government and the World Bank. The two-day visit, Oct. 21-22, showcased regional infrastructure and Tulane's expertise in framing and conceptualizing water management projects. The visit included two tours covering more than 100 miles and included stops at drainage pumps stations, surge barriers, and closures, as well as discussions with New Orleans city officials and Tulane water experts.

Click here to view pictures from the visit on our Flickr photo album.

Architecture faculty selected as authors for 2020 NOLA Book Fest

Faculty at the Tulane School of Architecture - including Richard Campanella, Margarita Jover, Carol McMichael Reese, and Dean Iñaki Alday - have been selected as authors for the New Orleans Book Festival at Tulane University.

The 2020 New Orleans Book Festival at Tulane University, a new major literary event for the Crescent City, will take place March 19-21, with a lineup featuring best-selling authors including Jason Berry, Roy Blount Jr., Donna L. Brazile, David Brooks, Sarah M. Broom, Mika Brzezinski, Jean Case, Steve Case, Dave Eggers, Malcolm Gladwell, Eddie Glaude, Annette Gordon-Reed, John Grisham, Mitch Landrieu, Erik Larson, Michael Lewis, Eric Motley, Peter S. Onuf, Samantha Power, Sister Helen Prejean, Susan Rice, Joe Scarborough, Alon Shaya, Anne Snyder, Evan Thomas, Sean Tuohy, Kim Vaz-Deville and Darren Walker.

The three-day event will showcase nearly 100 national, regional and local authors; feature children’s and family programming sponsored by the Scholastic Corporation; and include numerous literary exhibitors. Festival organizers are expecting more than 30,000 attendees. All events will take place on Tulane’s uptown campus, including the Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life, McAlister Auditorium, Freeman Auditorium, Rogers Memorial Chapel and the Berger Family Lawn.

At a Nov. 16 press conference announcing the event, Tulane President Mike Fitts said the university has a “rich, renowned and vibrant literacy history.”

“It is Tulane’s great honor to host a festival that brings together the world’s leading authors, book lovers of all genres and the children of our community,” President Fitts said. “Events like this make our campus and the Tulane experience available to everyone, especially the young minds and aspiring writers of New Orleans.”

“Expanding literacy, the love of the written word, and the ability to express and articulate humanity’s most sublime thoughts and discoveries and aspirations, that’s the central role of higher education; that’s what we’re about at Tulane University,” he said.

The festival will spotlight eight tracks, including American Society, Health and Science, Food, New Orleans Culture, Sports, Children, Fiction and World War II in partnership with The National WWII Museum. There will be panel discussions, moderated conversations, keynote lectures, book fairs and workshops. Each day will include at least one major plenary session at which a leading author will be featured. It will also provide a forum for media outlets, authors and readers to network and collaborate in one of the most vibrant and culturally diverse cities in the world.

Family Day at the Festival on Saturday, March 21, will focus on literacy advancement and feature readings and special literacy-themed activities for New Orleans children and their families. Family Day is a joint partnership with the city of New Orleans’ Office of Youth and Families and Scholastic.

“This will be an opportunity for youth-serving organizations, our libraries, our recreation centers, and other nonprofits throughout the community to come here on campus and to have a day filled with family fun. But we hope that it will not just be the one day, but really extend out into our families’ experiences beyond the weekend, because there really is so much in our city to be enjoyed, and our mayor is committed to ensuring that all families have access to that,” Emily Wolff, director of the Office of Youth and Families, said.

Wolff said the event is an opportunity to also raise awareness about the city’s high rate of adult illiteracy and provide more resources to support that issue.

The festival will engage with teachers and school organizations, as well as literacy, child advocacy and city partners, to encourage attendance and participation in the festival. In addition, thousands of books will be distributed to local schools before the festival, as well as to many of the children attending the event. Prior to the event, Scholastic will announce the children’s authors that will participate at the festival.

The festival co-chairs are former New Orleans first lady Cheryl Landrieu and Tulane University Professor of History and best-selling biographer Walter Isaacson. Landrieu is the founder of the New Orleans Book Festival and has a long history of supporting strategic community initiatives in New Orleans, most recently focused on literacy and advocacy for the advancement of women and girls.

Isaacson is the past CEO of the Aspen Institute, where he is now a Distinguished Fellow, the former chairman of CNN and the former editor of TIME magazine. He is currently an advisory partner at Perella Weinberg, a financial services firm based in New York City.

“The New Orleans Book Festival began in 2010 as a free literary event for families in New Orleans,” said Landrieu. “We are excited to expand in partnership with Tulane University to create a weekend of events featuring prominent national and local writers and journalists. The city of New Orleans has a strong literary history, and this festival seeks to continue and grow the literary community in our area. The partnership with Tulane will also generate participation of a great number of talented writers from the Tulane community as well as interest from Tulane students. The New Orleans Book Festival will offer something to readers of all ages and backgrounds and will provide an opportunity for all members of our community to come together over a shared love of reading.”

Landrieu said she remembered being nervous about the first book festival, hosted at Milton Latter Memorial Library, but when she arrived, she saw the long line of children waiting.

“Just to see the excitement in their eyes that day made me realize that this is something that could continue.”

“As an author, I noticed that so many cities around the country have major book festivals,” Isaacson said. “I love all the festivals in New Orleans, but it seemed to me that somewhere in the cultural calendar between food and wine and jazz, it would be fun to do a major literary and ideas festival. The New Orleans Book Festival at Tulane University has a tremendous lineup for our first year, including some of the country’s most notable authors from a vast array of genres and disciplines. Our expectation is to bring leading authors from around the country, the city and campus, and make this one of the nation’s premier literary events. We hope to attract and captivate book enthusiasts from all over, especially in New Orleans, for a three-day celebration of literacy and culture.”
 

The full list of confirmed authors who will present during the festival includes Iñaki Alday, Jason Berry, Roy Blount Jr., Beau Boudreaux, Donna L. Brazile, David Brooks, Sarah M. Broom, Jill Conner Browne, Mika Brzezinski, Richard Campanella, Jean Case, Steve Case, Dave Eggers, Emma Fick, Malcolm Gladwell, Eddie Glaude, Annette Gordon-Reed, Richard Grant, Roberta Brandes Gratz, John Grisham, Yuri Herrera, Margarita Jover, Molly Kimball, Mitch Landrieu, Erik Larson, Nancy Lemann, Nick Lemann, Michael Lewis, Eric Motley, Peter S. Onuf, Tom Piazza, Lawrence N. Powell, Samantha Power, Sister Helen Prejean, Carol McMichael Reese, Susan Rice, Joe Scarborough, Alon Shaya, Anne Snyder, Michael Strecker, Evan Thomas, Sean Tuohy, Sheba Turk, Mark VanLandingham, Kim Vaz-Deville, Darren Walker, Henry Walther and Chris Yandle.

In addition to contemporary authors such as Tulane Professor of English Jesmyn Ward, a two-time National Book Award winner, New Orleans boasts a long list of authors with strong ties to the city. From William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams and Anne Rice to Tulane alumnus and Pulitzer Prize winner John Kennedy Toole, many authors have found their creativity and brilliance in the Crescent City.

Tulane’s own faculty have penned best-selling novels, histories and biographies and works on subjects ranging from ancient civilizations to the geography of New Orleans and the history of jazz.

Additional authors for the book festival will be announced in the coming months.

Click here to see photos from the event. For more information on the New Orleans Book Festival at Tulane University, please visit ​www.bookfest.Tulane.edu and follow along on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @NolaBookFest.

School of Architecture geographer and author wins Louisiana Writer Award

Tulane University geography professor Richard Campanella, author of 11 books on the geography, history, architecture and culture of Louisiana, is the recipient of the 2019 Louisiana Writer Award. The award is presented annually by the Louisiana Center for the Book of the State Library of Louisiana.

Campanella will receive the award Nov. 2 at the opening ceremony of the Louisiana Book Festival at the State Capitol in recognition of his outstanding contribution to documenting Louisiana’s history, culture and people.

“The historical geography of New Orleans and Louisiana is really the story of millions of people creating cityscapes and landscapes over hundreds of years,” said Campanella, a senior professor of practice in the Tulane School of Architecture. “I am humbled by the task of trying to understand all this complex place-making, and I feel deeply honored to be recognized by the state for the effort.”

Campanella’s works includes “Bienville’s Dilemma: A Historical Geography of New Orleans,” described by the New York Review of Books as the “single best history of the city…masterful.” He is also the author of “Geographies of New Orleans: Urban Fabrics Before the Storm” (University of Louisiana Press, 2006), which came out just after Hurricane Katrina. That book also won rave reviews, with The Times-Picayune calling it “a powerful (and) dazzling book, unparalleled in its scope, precision, clarity and detail.”

His book “Bourbon Street: A History,” was declared by the New York Review of Books as “absorbing...persuasive…gleefully subversive. There may be no one better qualified to write such a history than Campanella.”

A native of Brooklyn, New York, Campanella is the only two-time winner of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities Book of the Year Award. He has also won the Louisiana Literary Award, the Williams Prize, the Malcolm Heard Award for Excellence in Teaching, the Hannah Arendt Prize for Public Scholarship and the Tulane Honors Professor of the Year. In 2016, the Government of France named Campanella as Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes Académiques.

Campanella lives with his wife Marina and their son Jason in uptown New Orleans. His next book, “The West Bank of Greater New Orleans: A Historical Geography,” will be released by Louisiana State University Press in 2020.

To read the full story from Tulane University, click here.

Faculty to participate in study examining if clearing blight lowers teen violence in New Orleans

Two Tulane School of Architecture faculty members, Richard Campanella and Casius Pealer, will contribute to a new Tulane University research project studying whether maintaining vacant lots and fixing up blighted properties in high-crime areas reduces incidents of youth and family violence. The National Institutes of Health awarded Tulane a $2.3 million grant to test the theory in New Orleans.

Campanella, a geographer in the School of Architecture, will conduct GIS (Geographic Information Systems) analyses on the spatial relationships between blight in the built environment and violence in the social environment, and how they might change when blight is remediated.

Pealer, an attorney and director of the school’s Sustainable Real Estate Development program, will provide advice on individual property improvements and analysis of the potential impacts of this remediation work on neighborhood development and gentrification.

Read more on the project here.

Richard Campanella appointed Associate Dean for Research

Tulane School of Architecture - Richard Campanella

The Tulane University School of Architecture has named Senior Professor of Practice Richard Campanella as Associate Dean for Research. In this role, he will facilitate the production, publication and dissemination of new knowledge and innovative ideas, reinforcing the School of Architecture’s commitment to research.

Campanella brings a prolific portfolio of award-winning research to the position, including 10 books and more than 200 other publications on New Orleans and Louisiana geography, history, architecture, urbanism, culture and related topics.

As Associate Dean for Research, Campanella will identify and curate external research opportunities, assemble multidisciplinary research teams to respond to proposals, and coordinate faculty, staff and students pursuing research grant funding.

Campanella has worked at Tulane since 2000 and in the School of Architecture since 2012.

Richard Campanella awarded interdisciplinary collaboration fellowship

Richard Campanella, a senior professor of practice in the Tulane School of Architecture, is among the recipients of the Tulane ByWater Institute Faculty Fellowships in Interdisciplinary Collaboration announced last month.

Fellows are chosen by application and selected based on intellectual merit, potential for funding, and interdisciplinary methodology and/or theoretical framework. The recipients will use funds for preliminary data collection and refining methodologies in order to prepare and submit proposals to grant funding.

Campanella was awarded a fellowship with Kevin Gotham, a professor of sociology in the School of Liberal Arts. Their fellowship will support a grant proposal to be submitted to the National Science Foundation. The proposed two-year project will focus on the determinants of business owner support for coastal resilience measures. The project aims to understand how local business owners perceive environmental risk and how they make decisions regarding hurricane and flooding threats.

Read more in the New Wave story, “Tulane ByWater Institute awards faculty fellowships.”

Tulane geographer to discuss formation of New Orleans’ neighborhoods

This article originally appeared in Tulane's New Wave publication.

Story: Aaron Cohen. Photo: Jennifer Zdon

Imagine a New Orleans without its most popular neighborhoods: no Garden District, no Central City, no Carrollton, no Algiers. For most familiar with the city’s geography, the task is nearly unfathomable.

On Monday, Nov. 27, at 7 p.m., Tulane University geographer Richard Campanella will present a talk titled “Not-So-Friendly Neighbors: The Annexations of New Orleans” in the Freeman Auditorium at the Woldenberg Art Center on the uptown campus.

Following the publication of his most recent book, Cityscapes of New Orleans, Campanella will guide his audience through a critical and often overlooked aspect of the city’s history.

“In this illustrated lecture, I will explain the historical and geographical circumstances behind New Orleans’ aggressive municipal expansion of 1852-1874,” said Campanella. “It swallowed up three adjacent cities — everything from the Garden District and Central City all the way up to Carrollton and parts of Lakeview — while also consolidating Algiers into city limits.”

He continued: “These four annexations tend to get short shrift in our historiography, usually earning only fleeting mention as mere administrative adjustments. In fact, each was complex, hotly debated and perfectly contentious, with ethnic and racial tension, power politics, and greed all playing roles.”

Campanella hopes the lecture will provide a means to gauge the city’s past in an effort to better understand the present.

“New Orleans would be a vastly different city today had decisions been made differently,” he said. “Tulane, for example, would not be in New Orleans, but rather in Jefferson City. That’s the story I will tell on Nov. 27.”

Following the event, the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South will host a reception in Woodward Way, where Campanella will be available to take questions and sign books.

For more information, contact Regina Cairns at the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South at rcairns@tulane.edu.

Tulane scholars contribute to tricentennial book

New Wave Article 
January 02, 2017 8:45 AM | Mary Cross

 

As New Orleans gears up for its tricentennial celebration in 2018, a new book entitled New Orleans & The World: The Tricentennial Anthology will share the story of the Crescent City’s founding and illuminate the global impact of the city’s cultural contributions, including its unparalleled culinary tradition and resounding musical legacy, over the course of 300 years.

The anthology is being produced through a partnership between The New Orleans Convention and Visitors Bureau (NOCVB), the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation (NOTMC) and the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities (LEH).

The LEH has additionally assembled an editorial board of leading local scholars to oversee production of the publication. Board members include Richard Campanella, a senior professor of practice within the Tulane School of Architecture, Kara Tucina Olidge, executive director of the Amistad Research Center, and Tulane University professor emeritus Lawrence Powell

"The goal is to highlight the city’s cultural, historical, and political influence on the world." 

— Kara Tucina Olidge, executive director of the Amistad Research Center

“It’s a natural fit for the LEH to handle this project,” said Campanella, who has been researching the city’s historical geography for the past 22 years.

A regular columnist for Louisiana Cultural Vistas, LEH’s quarterly magazine, Campanella is additionally contributing two chapters to the upcoming tricentennial tribute.

“One is on the formation of the delta plain, and the other is on the urban development patterns of the city and architecture,” he said.

“New Orleans has an interesting, colorful history. The goal is to highlight the city’s cultural, historical, and political influence on the world,” said Olidge. “In addition to serving on the editorial board, I’m submitting a chapter on the civil rights movement in New Orleans and its relationship to the larger movement within the U.S.”

New Orleans & The World: The Tricentennial Anthology is scheduled to publish in the fall of 2017.

The Next 10 Years, a Panel Discussion featuring Faculty member Richard Campanella and Ramiro Diaz, TSA '00

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