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Students can get a jumpstart with Summer 2020 Courses. Offerings include design, architecture, photography, drawing, making, design thinking, historic preservation, real estate, and social innovation and social entrepreneurship. View the Tulane School of Architecture Summer 2020 Course Offerings.

Continue to check the TuSA COVID-19 FAQ, and the Tulane Emergency Management page for updates.

 

Kinnard featured in Madame Architect as trailblazer and admired educator

Judith Kinnard, FAIA, Tulane School of Architecture Professor of Architecture and Harvey-Wadsworth Chair of Landscape Urbanism, was recently interviewed by Julia Gamolina for Madame Architect. Below is an excerpt from the piece, titled "Designing the Future: Judith Kinnard on Academia, the Profession, and Expanding Boundaries," published April 30, 2020.

Given some of the sexism that still exists today despite so much awareness of it, I can’t imagine what it was like at a time when the same awareness wasn’t there. Was it at UVA that you became the first tenured design professor that was a woman?

Yes. There was one tenured history professor and one planning professor who were women, but none in design. I was at UVA for about twenty years, and it was a great place to teach and to practice. During that period we won four national design competitions with our practice, and this helped us develop a series of ideas involving architecture, urbanism and the landscape. Because we established a degree of national recognition, this led to my successful tenure case.

Then, I became Chair at UVA for five years, between ‘98 and 2003, working with Bill McDonough as the dean and three other wonderful chairs in landscape architecture, history of architecture, and planning. We introduced some themes that hadn’t been advanced in the past - design build and also studios that weren’t directly focused on buildings. I worked very hard to advance the dual-degree path with landscape architecture, facilitating a number of students to get both their Master of Architecture degree and their Master of Landscape Architecture degree. Thomas Woltz and Serena Nelson are great examples of this period in the school's history.

That’s fantastic. What did you do after UVA?

After a few years, my husband became the Dean at Tulane, in 2008. They offered me a full professor position with a generous endowed chair called the Harvey Wadsworth Chair in Landscape Urbanism, so we moved to New Orleans three years after Hurricane Katrina. We both felt compelled to contribute to the rebuilding of New Orleans in a more just and sustainable way. Some refer to “opportunity” in the post-Katrina setting, but we have avoided that word for obvious reasons. We felt that it was a responsibility.

The transition was a little bit tricky - I’ll say that being the wife of the dean was not my preferred role [laughs]. We’ve been very careful in our careers to maintain individual identities, so that aspect of it was a bit challenging. However, I had been asked to run for President of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, and a few years later, I was also elected as president of the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). So I had my own leadership identity, independent of the school, while maintaining and advancing strong teaching goals at Tulane. That was important for me - the leadership roles I’ve had outside of academia were highly visible opportunities to show how one can combine teaching, research, creative work and national service to the profession. I hope that I have served as a good role model.

To read the full interview in Madame Architect, click here.

First-ever Research Studios announced

Starting Fall 2019, students at Tulane School of Architecture will be part of design research that tackles some of the world’s most pressing contemporary problems through architecture. The school recently selected its first-ever Research Studios that will focus on a single topic, place, or phenomenon over three years, delving into greater detail and complexity in each cycle. Each studio will work toward the production of scholarly outputs such as books, monographs, articles, symposia, and exhibits. Students will have the opportunity to select several of these studios during their time at Tulane. See below for a list of the new Research Studios, the lead instructor, and short descriptions.

Yamuna River Project, The Rajasthan Cities.

Fall 2019. Open to graduate students only.

Lead Instructor: Iñaki Alday, Dean and Richard Koch Chair in Architecture

This Research Studio will analyze and develop scenarios for transforming two historic cities in India, Jaipur and Ajmer in Rajasthan, acting as an independent advisor to the Rajasthan government. In exploring urban growth strategies, the work will be developed at multiple scales, from that of the building to that of the public landscape. The multidisciplinary approach will include disciplinary perspectives from sociology, economics, environmental ecology, engineering, and governmental policy, with considerations about water as the overarching framework. The studio will travel to India during the fall break.

URBANbuild: re-evaluation, affordability, national translation.

Fall 2019-Spring 2020. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

Lead Instructor: Byron Mouton, AIA, Director of URBANbuild, Lacey Senior Professor of Practice in Architecture

This Research Studio continues URBANbuild’s longstanding commitment to the New Orleans community to design and build infill housing, providing a transformative hands-on experience for architecture students. Issues related to the sometimes-conflicting agendas of progress, preservation, affordability, and replication are debated. URBANbuild research will endeavor to “scale up” nationally, exploring different climatic and cultural contexts and proposing a research methodology for the production of prototypes. while addressing issues of design, community involvement, and affordability.

The Future of Ports: From the Backyard to the Forefront of Ecology, Economy, and Urbanity.

Fall 2019. Open to undergraduate students only.

Lead Instructor: Margarita Jover, Associate Professor in Architecture

This Research Studio focuses on New Orleans’ Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, popularly known as the Industrial Canal, where an industrial landscape meets residential neighborhoods. A multidisciplinary team will document the adjacent properties and buildings, research comparable examples and best practices worldwide, and propose innovative design-research projects, engaging stakeholders through a compelling exhibit and public conversation about how best to utilize these neglected mixed-use spaces.

Resilience Reinforced: Architectural precast concrete systems addressing the regional water infrastructure challenges.

Fall 2019. Open to graduate students only.

Lead Instructor: Kentaro Tsubaki, AIA, Associate Dean for Academics, Favrot Associate Professor of Architecture

Through design investigations, this Research Studio examines the potential of precast concrete systems and advanced fabrication technology to address stormwater runoffs at two urban scales. At the street scale, paving and rain-garden systems will introduce students to water management infrastructure and aesthetically appealing precast paving systems. At the neighborhood scale, linear-park design will introduce students to complex water management challenges and provide opportunities to speculate on advanced precast systems as solutions.

Contemporary Architecture in Historic Contexts: The Case of Magazine Street in New Orleans.

Fall 2019. Open to undergraduate students only.

Lead Instructor: Ammar Eloueini, AIA, NCARB, Favrot V Professor of Architecture

How, as architects, can we think about the future of cities in a way that will preserve their historic character while responding to urgent social and environmental needs? This Research Studio will explore an alternative approach to issues of development in historical neighborhoods, where context is considered from geographic, cultural, political, and economic perspectives, and contemporary materials and techniques of construction are utilized. Magazine Street—an iconic pathway in New Orleans with a mix of commercial and residential structures that attracts tourists and residents alike—will serve as our study area. We will also study Magazine in comparison to other such iconic streets in the U.S. and abroad.

Toward a Civic Landscape.

Spring 2020. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

Lead Instructor: Scott Bernhard, AIA, NCARB, Favrot III Associate Professor of Architecture

This Research Studio expands upon existing work in New Orleans to envision a merging of urban infrastructure, ecological stewardship, and public space. It explores issues of food scarcity and security in the urban context through a synthesis of several areas of research in urban agriculture, ecological remediation, water management, public parks, and the nature of public space. This research proposes to articulate and substantiate an emerging civic identity in redefining public perceptions of place, infrastructure, and urbanity.

Fast/Strong/Sustainable: Exploring the Expanded Mass Timber Industry for Design in Hurricane-Prone Regions.

Spring 2020. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

Lead Instructor: Judith Kinnard, FAIA, Harvey-Wadsworth Chair of Landscape Urbanism, Professor of Architecture

This Research Studio will expand the inquiry of mass timber research employed in the construction of tall buildings to include lower-scale and residential settings where the speed of production and assembly are of essence. Hurricanes in the Gulf South have destroyed and damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, and it is imperative that new approaches be explored for sustainable transitional and permanent housing. Prototypes that use local resources have the potential to expand the regional economy and deemphasize extraction industries.

Small Center project wins AIA Louisiana Honor Award

Hollygrove Shade-Water Pavilion, a project by the Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design, was recently recognized with an Honor Award in the small project category of the American Institute of Architects Louisiana 2018 design competition.

A nationally recognized panel of judges selected 16 winning projects from 73 entries submitted by architects statewide. The jury noted the Shade-Water Pavilion’s “great relationship between the scale of the human and the scale of the structure” and “incredible concrete bays.”

The pavilion provides an outdoor community gathering area in an unused infrastructural space with a mechanism to collect, display and distribute rain water. Tulane School of Architecture faculty members Judith Kinnard, FAIA and Irene Keil served as design leads with Small Center staff member Nick Jenisch as project manager on the collaborative effort with students, faculty, staff and community partners Carrollton/Hollygrove Community Development Corporation and the New Orleans Sewage and Water Board.

The Small Center is the community design center of the Tulane School of Architecture. Learn more about the center’s work with nonprofit organizations and community groups to provide design services to underserved communities at http://small.tulane.edu.

Tulane professor honored for contributions to architectural education

A Tulane School of Architecture professor is being recognized for her impact as a national leader in architectural education.

Judith Kinnard, FAIA, professor of architecture and Harvey-Wadsworth Chair of Landscape Urbanism, was recently named a Distinguished Professor by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture.

The honor is given for “sustained creative achievement in the advancement of architectural education.”

Kinnard — an educator, designer and thought leader — has spent nearly 40 years inspiring architecture students, contributing to the field’s knowledge base and putting innovative ideas into practice in award-winning projects of her own.

“The profession of architecture has shifted dramatically in recent years, expanding beyond the limits of designing buildings and physical environments,” said Kinnard. “It is more and more challenging to package an education that is both broad enough to encompass multiple futures for our graduates and focused enough to give them real skills to enter the profession today and be prepared for what it will be 25 years from now.”

Kinnard is influencing this conversation at a national level as president of the National Architectural Accrediting Board. The organization’s accreditation process ensures schools of architecture are meeting core standards to prepare students for the field. She is also a past president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, which represents more than 200 schools of architecture and 5,000 faculty.

At Tulane, much of Kinnard’s teaching focuses on bringing students out of the classroom to understand and appreciate the places to which they will contribute as designers.

“One of the interesting things about teaching studios in New Orleans is that although the city is unique, it has lessons that apply to most American cities,” said Kinnard.

Tulane University alumna Dana Buntrock was among the four other Distinguished Professor Award recipients. The winners will be celebrated in March during ACSA’s annual meeting in Denver.

ARCH 4610/6610

The orthographic triad of plan, section and elevation drawing has been the dominant way to conceptualize and describe built form since the role of the architect became distinct from that of the builder in the 15th century.

AIA Features TSA Faculty members Judith Kinnard, FAIA and Allison H. Anderson, FAIA, in "Lessons from Katrina"

Lessons from Katrina

Seven Gulf Coast-area architects speak about what they’ve learned in the decade since the hurricane

By Scott Frank

To coincide with the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, we reached out to a cross-section of architects for their first-hand and varied insights on any positive developments in terms of design approaches, public policy changes, client attitudes, and still-remaining gaps and vulnerabilities for the Gulf Coast region... Full Article HERE. 

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American cities will require significant investment in housing to satisfy the demand for urban living from both millennials and boomers. The core curriculum of most schools of architecture does not adequately address this typology. Housing design requires the artful balancing of conflicting agendas. The individual’s desire for privacy and unique identity are often at odds with the larger goals of collective form and urban density.