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Students can get a jumpstart with Summer 2020 Courses. Offerings include design, architecture, photography, drawing, making, design thinking, historic preservation, real estate, and social innovation and social entrepreneurship. View the Tulane School of Architecture Summer 2020 Course Offerings.

Continue to check the TuSA COVID-19 FAQ page, and the Tulane Return to Campus website for updates.

 

Foundation Awards Grant to Rework Waterfront in Argentinian City

The Baton Rouge Area Foundation has approved a $75,000 grant to Tulane School of Architecture and The Water Institute of the Gulf to support their work in developing a plan to remake the waterfront in Quilmes, Argentina.

The Tulane School of Architecture team on the grant includes Dean Iñaki Alday, serving as principal investigator, and Associate Professor Margarita Jover, along with student research assistants, all of whom will work with scientists and engineers at The Water Institute.

Tulane’s School of Architecture and the Institute will provide the needed coastal science and urban repair advice that policymakers, scientists and designers in the Quilmes-Rio de la Plata region of Argentina need to reinvent their coastline. Tulane and The Water Institute will advise on the leading projects currently under consideration by Quilmes and its more than half-million inhabitants.

Quilmes wants to transform an area of slaughterhouses and heavy industries along the coast into communities that include a diverse mix of incomes. The new waterfront is envisioned to include affordable housing and public places, such as parks and plazas.

Scientists and land planners from Tulane and The Water Institute will review the current conditions and the impact of potential interventions to develop scenarios for the city and its residents to consider. These scenarios may include changes to existing land-use plans and working to develop a unified vision for the entire waterfront to achieve the long-term vibrancy of the city.

“This grant continues our belief that the best water science in the world is coming from Louisiana, and the solutions should be shared to benefit the thee billion people who live on shifting coasts around the world,” said John G. Davies, president and CEO of the Baton Rouge Area Foundation. “The grant also supports the researchers and urbanists from Tulane and The Water Institute as they build their young partnership.”

The Foundation started the Institute to provide independent science for implementing the Louisiana Coastal Master Plan. Now a stand-alone science institute, it has expanded its work around the planet, offering solutions to rising seas and vanishing wetlands in Fiji, Vietnam, Chile, with more recent collaborations with science organizations in Israel, Netherlands, France and Samoa.

Architecture graduate student presents hybridized infrastructure at national symposium

Exploring how architecture can improve water management and engage communities in New Orleans, recent master’s architecture graduate Riley Lacalli developed a project that proposes a new infrastructure system and presented his work at a national conference this spring.

The CriticalMASS Graduate Research Symposium at the University of North Carolina Charlotte in April brought together 14 students for presentations to panels of experts from across the country. Lacalli, who graduated from the Tulane School of Architecture’s M.Arch I program in May, said the experience at CriticalMASS was both informative and inspiring with students’ topics ranging from virtual libraries to smog-diffusing glass, Lacalli said.

“The diverse representation of projects reinforced the idea that architecture can be used to positively influence a variety of problems,” he said.

Lacalli’s thesis project “Pumps Politikos” addresses urban infrastructural systems and the problems many cities, coastal cities in particular, are facing as the threat of climate change rises. Among his design solutions, he proposes a series of canopies, elevated above streets and around pumping stations, as green spaces for not only rainwater collection but also civic engagement. The goal is to create a better water management system that utilizes every drop of water as an asset and, by making these sites accessible, reconnect communities to infrastructure allowing them to play a role in the monitoring and management of the system.

“To combat issues such as rising sea levels, land loss, and an increased occurrence of natural disasters, urban environments and the machines that keep them afloat must be redesigned in a multi-scalar, multi-systemic manner,” said Lacalli. “My interest in architecture lies in its ability to contribute to many different disciplines and across many different scales. I would love to get involved with an architecture firm that is taking on projects at a larger city or neighborhood scale, specifically projects that work with the existing fabric and attempt to provide holistic and dynamic responses to potential problems.”

Ammar Eloueini's J-House featured in Architect Magazine

The work of Ammar Eloueini, Professor of Architecture at Tulane School of Architecture, is featured in the May 2019 issue of ARCHITECT magazine. J-House, designed and constructed through Eloueini's private practice AEDS I Ammar Eloueini Digit-all Studio in New Orleans. Below is an excerpt from the magazine piece, which features images of the interior and exterior, elevations, floor plans, as well as background inspiration and specs on the house.

What do you get when you cross a New Orleans shotgun house with a loft and lift the whole thing above the flood plain? If you have a powerful computer, a clever engineer, and happen to be as good an architect as Ammar Eloueini, AIA, the result could be the J-House: an elegantly twisted steel-and-wood structure that rises out of a standard lot to catch the breeze, offer views of its surroundings, and provide refuge from the potential of rising floodwaters.

For the full story and photos and plans of J-House, click here.

Spring 2019 Final Reviews

Final Reviews Calendar

Click on the link above to view the Spring 2019 Final Reviews Virtual Booklet, including a calendar of scheduled reviews and bios of our guest critics. Final Reviews end with a celebratory Thesis Reception on Wednesday, May 8, at 6 p.m. on the Academic Quad in front of Richardson Memorial Hall. All are welcome to attend any or all of the review events.

For more information, email tsaevents@tulane.edu.

Graduate student studies drug-overdose prevention sites

With the surge of opioid overdose-related fatalities in the U.S., the country is in need of spaces designed to prevent people with drug addictions from accidental death. That is the focus of Tulane School of Architecture graduate student Lucy Satzewich (M.Arch), who recently won a national fellowship from the American Institute of Architects and Academy of Architecture for Health Foundation.

Satzewich is interested in developing standards for designing overdose prevention sites that adhere to a harm-reduction methodology, balance the needs of public and private space, and prioritize the expertise of frontline social workers and health professionals.

Rather than focusing on addiction recovery – though that is available for anyone who is interested – prevention sites allow spaces for safe drug use with the goal of preventing overdoses. One of the most crucial elements to overdose prevention sites is that they carry and distribute Naloxone, an internationally approved medication for reversing heroin and prescription opioid overdoses. Overdose prevention sites also diminish the spread of diseases including HIV and Hepatitis C, discourage public drug use, treat minor wounds, and refer users, if willing, to recovery programs.

“Overdose prevention sites empower users with the choice to enter a facility that holds a lifesaving medication and provide out-reach to marginalized populations wary of traditional health facilities,” Satzewich said. “However, in the U.S. wide adoption of these spaces is being delayed due to concerns about public and user safety.”

The AIA-AAH and AAH Foundation fellowship award will support Satzewich’s travel this summer to visit and talk with stakeholders at clinics and prevention sites in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. From this research, Satzewich will develop a document – with guidance from faculty at Tulane, as well as other experts in healthcare, architecture and design – that identifies best practices for overdose prevention sites. Satzewich also plans to present her findings to national audiences, such as the Healthcare Design Conference in 2020.

“Governments have acknowledged the death toll – nearly 170,000 drug-overdose fatalities in the U.S. last year – and the strain on federal resources related to incarceration and hospitalization, and the medical community has found that safe well-designed buildings can be part of the solution,” Satzewich said. “This research will contribute to the cultivation of health facilities accessible to all people.”

Image: Graphic by Lucy Satzewich on reported overdoses in New Orleans.

First-ever Research Studios announced

Starting Fall 2019, students at Tulane School of Architecture will be part of design research that tackles some of the world’s most pressing contemporary problems through architecture. The school recently selected its first-ever Research Studios that will focus on a single topic, place, or phenomenon over three years, delving into greater detail and complexity in each cycle. Each studio will work toward the production of scholarly outputs such as books, monographs, articles, symposia, and exhibits. Students will have the opportunity to select several of these studios during their time at Tulane. See below for a list of the new Research Studios, the lead instructor, and short descriptions.

The Rajasthan Cities: Jaipur. (A Saul A. Mintz Global Research Studio)

Fall 2019. Open to graduate students only.

Lead Instructor: Iñaki Alday, Dean and Richard Koch Chair in Architecture

This Research Studio will analyze and develop scenarios for transforming two historic cities in India, Jaipur and Ajmer in Rajasthan, acting as an independent advisor to the Rajasthan government. In exploring urban growth strategies, the work will be developed at multiple scales, from that of the building to that of the public landscape. The multidisciplinary approach will include disciplinary perspectives from sociology, economics, environmental ecology, engineering, and governmental policy, with considerations about water as the overarching framework. The studio will travel to India during the fall break.

URBANbuild: re-evaluation, affordability, national translation.

Fall 2019-Spring 2020. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

Lead Instructor: Byron Mouton, AIA, Director of URBANbuild, Lacey Senior Professor of Practice in Architecture

This Research Studio continues URBANbuild’s longstanding commitment to the New Orleans community to design and build infill housing, providing a transformative hands-on experience for architecture students. Issues related to the sometimes-conflicting agendas of progress, preservation, affordability, and replication are debated. URBANbuild research will endeavor to “scale up” nationally, exploring different climatic and cultural contexts and proposing a research methodology for the production of prototypes. while addressing issues of design, community involvement, and affordability.

The Future of Ports: From the Backyard to the Forefront of Ecology, Economy, and Urbanity.

Fall 2019. Open to undergraduate students only.

Lead Instructor: Margarita Jover, Associate Professor in Architecture

This Research Studio focuses on New Orleans’ Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, popularly known as the Industrial Canal, where an industrial landscape meets residential neighborhoods. A multidisciplinary team will document the adjacent properties and buildings, research comparable examples and best practices worldwide, and propose innovative design-research projects, engaging stakeholders through a compelling exhibit and public conversation about how best to utilize these neglected mixed-use spaces.

Resilience Reinforced: Architectural precast concrete systems addressing the regional water infrastructure challenges.

Fall 2019. Open to graduate students only.

Lead Instructor: Kentaro Tsubaki, AIA, Associate Dean for Academics, Favrot Associate Professor of Architecture

Through design investigations, this Research Studio examines the potential of precast concrete systems and advanced fabrication technology to address stormwater runoffs at two urban scales. At the street scale, paving and rain-garden systems will introduce students to water management infrastructure and aesthetically appealing precast paving systems. At the neighborhood scale, linear-park design will introduce students to complex water management challenges and provide opportunities to speculate on advanced precast systems as solutions.

Contemporary Architecture in Historic Contexts: The Case of Magazine Street in New Orleans.

Fall 2019. Open to undergraduate students only.

Lead Instructor: Ammar Eloueini, AIA, NCARB, Favrot V Professor of Architecture

How, as architects, can we think about the future of cities in a way that will preserve their historic character while responding to urgent social and environmental needs? This Research Studio will explore an alternative approach to issues of development in historical neighborhoods, where context is considered from geographic, cultural, political, and economic perspectives, and contemporary materials and techniques of construction are utilized. Magazine Street—an iconic pathway in New Orleans with a mix of commercial and residential structures that attracts tourists and residents alike—will serve as our study area. We will also study Magazine in comparison to other such iconic streets in the U.S. and abroad.

Toward a Civic Landscape.

Spring 2020. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

Lead Instructor: Scott Bernhard, AIA, NCARB, Favrot III Associate Professor of Architecture

This Research Studio expands upon existing work in New Orleans to envision a merging of urban infrastructure, ecological stewardship, and public space. It explores issues of food scarcity and security in the urban context through a synthesis of several areas of research in urban agriculture, ecological remediation, water management, public parks, and the nature of public space. This research proposes to articulate and substantiate an emerging civic identity in redefining public perceptions of place, infrastructure, and urbanity.

Fast/Strong/Sustainable: Exploring the Expanded Mass Timber Industry for Design in Hurricane-Prone Regions.

Spring 2020. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

Lead Instructor: Judith Kinnard, FAIA, Harvey-Wadsworth Chair of Landscape Urbanism, Professor of Architecture

This Research Studio will expand the inquiry of mass timber research employed in the construction of tall buildings to include lower-scale and residential settings where the speed of production and assembly are of essence. Hurricanes in the Gulf South have destroyed and damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, and it is imperative that new approaches be explored for sustainable transitional and permanent housing. Prototypes that use local resources have the potential to expand the regional economy and deemphasize extraction industries.

Addis Ababa River Project. (A Saul A. Mintz Global Research Studio)

Fall 2019. Open to graduate students only.

Lead Instructor: Rubén García Rubio, Assistant Professor of Architecture and Urbanism

The main objective of the research studio is to design a holistic urban strategy for the city of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, through all the Akaki River tributaries - more than 50 kilometers - which cross the capital. The studio will travel to Addis Ababa and the work developed will be exhibited in the U.S. and Ethiopia.

DesignIntelligence 2019 surveys now open

For 20 years, DesignIntelligence has conducted its America’s Top Ranked Architecture & Design Schools Survey and published the results in an annual report and school ranking. This ranking of undergraduate and graduate programs in architecture, landscape design and interior architecture highlights the schools best preparing students for professional practice.

Now is the time to fill out the 2019 DesignIntelligence surveys for schools of architecture. Last year the Tulane School of Architecture's B.Arch program was ranked No. 16, and our M.Arch program entered in the rankings again at No. 31.

Please take a moment to support Tulane's undergraduate and graduate architecture programs by filling out the survey, or forwarding the information to the correct contact in your firm. The deadline is Friday, May 31, 2019.

In one survey, architecture professionals in supervising/hiring roles are asked to share their perspectives on which schools are best preparing graduates for practice. Click here for that survey.

Current students and recent graduates, within 24 months, are invited to complete a separate survey on their educational experience and future plans. Click here for that survey.

Those working in academic settings are asked to fill out a third survey. Click here for that survey

For more information about the annual surveys and report, go to http://zurl.co/802v.

Alumni (M.Arch '98) win international award for Confluence Park

Tulane School of Architecture alumni Tenna Florian (M.Arch ‘98) of Lake|Flato Architects in San Antonio, Texas, and Andrew Kudless (M.Arch ‘98) of Matsys Design in Oakland, California, were both on the design team for Confluence Park, which was recently awarded a 2019 Institute Honor Award for Architecture by AIA International. Additionally, Kudless who is an associate professor at California College of the Arts, was awarded the 2019 Faculty Design Award for Confluence Park by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture.

As described by the architects, “Along the bank of the San Antonio River, Confluence Park is a living laboratory designed to broaden its visitors’ understanding of south Texas ecotypes and the impact of urban development on local watersheds. A destination for learning and recreation, the park is a piece of the country’s largest environmental restoration project and an accessible gateway to outdoor activity.

"To better serve San Antonio’s most economically challenged communities, the San Antonio River Foundation tasked the design team with transforming a former construction storage yard into a unique outdoor education center. The design reflects the idea of confluence—the park is situated at the junction of the San Antonio River and San Pedro Creek—throughout. Grand gestures such as the park’s shaped lands represent the convergence of ecotypes, while the central pavilion’s concrete petal structures draw inspiration from plants that funnel rainwater to their roots. The petals, of which the pavilion boasts 22, stand 26 feet high and form a network of vaults that provide shade from the Texas sun and flow rainwater directly to an underground cistern.

"The park is located beside Mission Reach, an eight-mile stretch of the San Antonio River with a riparian woodland ecosystem that connects—via a network of pedestrian trails—the downtown San Antonio River Walk to several south side communities and five UNESCO World Heritage Spanish mission sites. Surrounding homeowners concerned about safety initially balked at the idea of the project and asked that adjacent dead-end streets remain fenced off. Throughout construction, foundation representatives canvased entire neighborhoods to provide updates on the park. These interpersonal connections created a groundswell of enthusiasm, and fences were eventually replaced with gates, providing easier access to a new neighborhood amenity.

"Early in the design process, the foundation realized it was creating a venue that could easily surpass its intended program. Evolving the design, the team and client trended toward the aspirational to maximize the efforts of local organizations striving to make a positive impact on San Antonio. Since the park opened, in March 2018, the collaborative ethos evident in the foundation’s directives has already made a positive impact on the community. In just a few short months, the park hosted nearly 140 educational events presented by 24 nonprofits which were attended by more than 9,000 registrants."

Read the official announcement from the AIA International here.

Read the ACSA Faculty Design Award announcement here.

Photo Credit: Casey Dunn

Architectural Digest recognizes alumnus as a 2019 top designer

Architectural Digest named Tulane School of Architecture alumnus and Board of Advisors member Jamie Bush (M '94) among its AD100. The honor recognizes design legends to young talents carving out a space of their own:

"If the legendary decorator Michael Taylor was the father of the “California look,” then Bush might justifiably be described as a progenitor of the New California look—a style predicated on reverence for natural materials, with all their inherent imperfections, as well as artisanal craftsmanship, pronounced texture, and simple, bold gestures. Though his work is focused on the realm of interiors, Bush’s training as an architect is evident in his respectful embrace of historic structures by the likes of John Lautner and Pierre Koenig as well as a host of contemporary architect collaborators. His acute eye and easy manner have made Bush a go-to designer for myriad Hollywood potentates and titans of Silicon Valley."

See the writeup in Architectural Digest here.

Alumnus prefab work wins national awards

Maziar Behrooz, TSA '85, and his firm MB Architecture received several awards in 2018 for the project Bard College Center for Experimental Humanities. The building was named runner-up in Dwell magazine's 2018 Best of Design awards in the prefab category. DrivenxDesign also gave the project awards in two categories: DrivenxDesign New York, Public & Institutional, Gold 2018, and DrivenxDesign Now, Social and Community-Oriented Design, Silver 2018.

For more information about the project on Dwell.com, click here.

Click here for the DrivenxDesign New York award page, and click here for the DrivenxDesign Now award page.

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