Places

  • Algiers Point Historic District

    The historic West Bank communities of Gretna and Algiers Point are defined by their small-town atmosphere and diverse collections of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century residential architecture.

  • Chalmette Battlefield

    As the site of the 1814–15 Battle of New Orleans, Chalmette Battlefield has been the focus of preservation and commemoration efforts for over a century, yet all but one of the site’s historic plantations have been lost.

  • Charity Hospital

    An institution in New Orleans since 1736, Charity Hospital’s sixth and final location was vacated after Hurricane Katrina and remains at risk for demolition despite its structural solidity and potential for adaptive reuse.

  • Coliseum Square and the Camp Street Up-Ramp

    Historic Coliseum Square and the surrounding Lower Garden District neighborhood were heavily threatened by bridge approaches that were ultimately demolished or defeated thanks to preservationists’ ceaseless efforts.

  • Faubourg Tremé

    Faubourg Tremé, one of New Orleans’ oldest neighborhoods and a touchstone of local African American culture, continues to thrive despite numerous large-scale demolitions in the name of progress.

  • Felicity Redevelopment, Inc. Is Established

    Since 1998, non-profit developer Felicity Redevelopment, Inc. has worked to stabilize lower Central City in an effort to put “the neighbor back in neighborhood.”

  • Fort Jackson Is Designated a National Historic Landmark

    Built in 1822 at the mouth of the Mississippi River, Fort Jackson earned National Historic Landmark status in 1960 and continues to be an important cultural site for the Plaquemines Parish community.

  • Fort Pike Is Listed on the National Register of Historic Places

    Historic Fort Pike has sustained significant hurricane damage and continues to be vulnerable to future natural disasters and neglect.

  • Fort Proctor Is Listed on the National Register of Historic Places

    Fort Proctor is a partially constructed nineteenth-century fortification that has suffered from more than a century of environment-related damage.

  • Gretna Historic District

    The historic West Bank communities of Gretna and Algiers Point are defined by their small-town atmosphere and diverse collections of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century residential architecture.

  • Julia Row

    The restoration of these historic row houses, nicknamed “Skid Row” in the 1970s, began with 604-06 Julia Street and the dedication of a small group of preservationists.

  • LeBeau Plantation Is Destroyed by Arson

    After sitting vacant for decades, Arabi’s historic LeBeau Plantation was destroyed by arson in 2013.

  • Longue Vue House and Gardens Opens to the Public

    The historic house and grounds at Longue Vue House and Gardens reflect the glamour of refined life in 1940s New Orleans.

  • Louisiana Landmarks Society and the Pitot House

    Founded in 1950, Louisiana Landmarks Society has played a central role in the protection of the city’s endangered landmarks for over sixty years.

  • Louisiana Landmarks Society Saves the Pitot House from Demolition

    Thanks to the efforts of the Louisiana Landmarks Society, the Pitot House on Bayou St. John stands as one of the city’s few surviving examples of a Creole colonial plantation-style house.

  • Louisiana Supreme Court Building

    The Beaux Arts–style Louisiana Supreme Court Building replaced an entire block of historic Vieux Carré buildings at a time when no legislation existed to protect them.

  • Preservation Resource Center

    Since its founding in 1974, Preservation Resource Center has become a leading advocacy and educational organization for the residents of New Orleans.

  • Preservationists Campaign to Save the World Trade Center

    The “Save WTC NOLA” campaign pushed for redevelopment rather than demolition of this unique mid-century-modern building in downtown New Orleans.

  • Preservationists Try to Save Historic Fort St. John

    Built in 1808, historic Fort St. John remains in severe disrepair despite a years-long preservation campaign led by Margaret “Sunny” Schiro.

  • Save Our Cemeteries

    Responding to the threat of demolition, Save Our Cemeteries was established in 1974 to preserve one of New Orleans’ oldest cemeteries and has since been instrumental in the protection of several others throughout the city.

  • Temple Sinai Is Demolished

    Temple Sinai was demolished in 1977 and replaced with a parking lot despite public outcry and the Historic District Landmarks Commission’s efforts to protect it.

  • The 1850 House Museum Is Established

    The Lower Pontalba Building’s 1850 House, one of the city’s oldest historic house museums, portrays a typical antebellum Creole residence at the height of the city’s prosperity.

  • The Beauregard-Keyes House Opens as a House Museum

    Restored in the mid-twentieth century after decades of neglect, the Beauregard-Keyes House opened as a historic house museum in 1970 in honor of two of its notable inhabitants.

  • The Cabildo and Presbytere

    In one of the city’s first preservation battles, citizens defeated a proposal to demolish two of New Orleans’ beloved historic landmarks.

  • The Civic Theatre Reopens

    Shuttered for decades, the historic downtown Civic Theatre was reborn in 2013 as a state-of-the-art events venue.

  • The Faubourg Marigny Historic District Is Designated

    The Faubourg Marigny Historic District continues to battle threats to its historic integrity despite numerous protective measures.

  • The Gallier House Opens as a House Museum

    A museum since 1971, Gallier House captures the Civil War–era lifestyle of one innovative nineteenth-century architect and his young family.

  • The Garden District Historic District Is Designated

    The Garden District Historic District has been protected by limited Historic District Landmarks Commission oversight since 2007.

  • The Greater New Orleans Bridge and the Delord-Sarpy House

    The Delord-Sarpy House was considered to be the oldest remaining structure above Canal Street when it was demolished for an exit ramp for the new Greater New Orleans Bridge.

  • The Hermann-Grima House Opens as a House Museum

    A museum since 1971, the Hermann-Grima House is an important antebellum example of American architectural influence in the Vieux Carré.

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